Experience astronomy with BRESSER

Large selection of telescopes and accessories - for beginners and professionals


Himmel und Erde in randscharfen, brillanten Bildern – durch das lichtstarke Astro-Fernglas mit großen Objektiven und voll mehrschichtvergüteten BaK4-Optiken
125,00 € *
Lens solar filter, suitable for the BRESSER telescopes 4512001 Sirius, 4511759 Stellar and 4511609 Arcturus
19,90 € * Shipping Weight 0.05 kg
German equatorial mount that allows perfect alignment with the celestial pole and convenient RA tracking with only one axis
135,00 € * Shipping Weight 6.9 kg
Designed to accept all legacy EXPLORE SCIENTIFIC finder scope brackets and mini dovetail-type e.g. Vixen, Synta, and Celestron finder scope brackets.
24,90 € * Shipping Weight 0.1 kg
AP mount base for converting the AP and AP-SM mount to an APZ azimuthal mount with a load capacity of 8 kg
119,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.85 kg
Stay independent from the power grid with this powerstation for charging smartphones, tablets, notebooks and for mobile 12Volt/230Volt power supply of electrical devices; pure sinus wave at 230V/500W
499,00 € * Shipping Weight 8.6 kg
Quality Barlow lens with 3x magnification factor and a plug-in diameter of 1.25 inch (31.7mm). Suitable for the BRESSER Carbon Look telescope series as a spare part.
12,90 € * Shipping Weight 0.15 kg
Ultra-compact solar panel for charging smartphones, power banks, etc., fast and efficient thanks to state-of-the-art monocrystalline solar cells and additional USB-A socket with QC3.0 standard
249,00 € * Shipping Weight 5 kg
Ultra-compact solar panel for charging smartphones, power banks, etc., fast and efficient thanks to state-of-the-art monocrystalline solar cells and additional USB-A socket with QC3.0 standard
149,00 € * Shipping Weight 3 kg
Ultra-compact solar panel for charging smartphones, power banks, etc., fast and efficient thanks to state-of-the-art monocrystalline solar cells and additional USB-A socket with QC3.0 standard
199,00 € * Shipping Weight 4.2 kg

Experience astronomy with Bresser

For thousands of years, people have been studying the stars in the sky. Particularly conspicuously arranged groups of stars were named long ago - and these names are still found in the signs of the zodiac today. Astronomy has undergone a breathtaking development up to the present day - and there is no end to this development in sight. Galileo was the first person to look at the sky with a telescope 300 years ago - in 1991, the first astronomical telescope (Hubble) was placed in space.

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Would you like to order from us as school, university or public institution? Would you like to order from us as a school, university or public institution? Please direct your enquiry to info(at)bresser.de, stating the invoice address (delivery address if applicable). Delivery is made on account. This also applies to a value of goods of more than 1000.00 Euro.

Even today, astronomers like Galileo begin the first observations with the naked eye. The basic prerequisite for this is, of course, a clear starry sky. That is why astronomers do not wish for friendly greetings at the end of a forum entry, for example, but for Clear Skies (cs abbreviated). No less important is the location of the sky observer: the best observing results can be achieved in a dark location, without any disturbing lights nearby.

Every beginning is difficult: At first, every beginning astronomer finds the first observations difficult, since stars and constellations are always in motion and change position in the sky depending on the season, date and time. One exception is Polaris in the constellation of the "Little Bear". Pole Star is always at the same place in the starry sky in the north and can be found there all year round. The arrangement of the stars, however, depends on the date and time - they rotate slowly counterclockwise around Polaris. Read our big Bresser Telescope Primer, here to learn more about astronomy.

When observing stars with a telescope, it quickly becomes clear that they disappear from the field of view after a few minutes. To compensate for this effect, there are equatorial mounts with an exact hour axis that can be tracked manually or fully automatically. This allows you to follow the exact movement of a star.

 

To the accessories for your telescope!

With Lunt Solarsystems, we offer you high-quality solar telescopes for observing the sun without danger: Marvel at massive prominences, groups of sunspots, powerful energy bursts and much more. Whether you need a complete solar telescope or the appropriate solar filters for retrofitting a normal telescope, we offer you the optimal and safe solution for impressive observations of the sun in the different wavelength ranges H-alpha, Ca-K und white light. Of course you will also find suitable accessories from special adapters to H-Alpha optimised eyepieces.

 

To the solar telescopes!

With the telescopes from EXPLORE SCIENTIFIC , we offer you a wide range of products for advanced amateur astronomers. These telescopes have won numerous awards thanks to a high level of innovation, decades of experience as well as close cooperation with amateur astronomers all over the world.

 

To the telescopes for advanced and experts!!

Even today, astronomers like Galileo begin the first observations with the naked eye. The basic prerequisite for this is, of course, a clear starry sky. That is why astronomers do not wish for friendly greetings at the end of a forum entry, for example, but for Clear Skies (cs abbreviated). No less important is the location of the sky observer: the best observing results can be achieved in a dark location, without any disturbing lights nearby.

Every beginning is difficult: At first, every beginning astronomer finds the first observations difficult, because stars and constellations are always in motion and change position in the sky depending on the season, date and time. One exception is Polaris in the constellation of the Little Bear. The Pole Star is always at the same place in the starry sky in the north and can be found there all year round. However, the arrangement of the celestial bodies depends on the date and time - they rotate slowly counterclockwise around Polaris. For starters, the following video is very informative about how important the mount is for a telescope.