Experience astronomy with BRESSER

Large selection of telescopes and accessories - for beginners and professionals


The L-eXtreme is a two-band filter and the ideal choice for strong light pollution suppression. It allows astrophotography of objects with narrow-band emission in the O-III and H-alpha lines out of the city.
Specification
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 10
  • Eyepiece Barrel Diameter (mm): 31.7
  • Field of application [Telescope-filter]: Light Pollution Filter for Astrophotography
  • Telescope filter type: Nebula filter
189,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.25 kg
The L-eXtreme is a two-band filter and the ideal choice for strong light pollution suppression. It allows astrophotography of objects with narrow-band emission in the O-III and H-alpha lines out of the city.
Specification
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 15
  • Eyepiece Barrel Diameter (mm): 50.8
  • Telescope filter type: Nebula filter
  • Field of application [Telescope-filter]: Light Pollution Filter for Astrophotography
309,00 € *
The L-eNhance is a tri band filter and the ideal choice for enhanced light pollution suppression. It allows astrophotos to be taken of narroband emission objects in O-III, H-Beta and H-Alpha lines out of the city.
Specification
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 10
  • Eyepiece Barrel Diameter (mm): 31.7
  • Field of application [Telescope-filter]: Light Pollution Filter for Astrophotography
  • Telescope filter type: Nebula filter
189,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.26 kg
The L-eNhance is a tri band filter and the ideal choice for enhanced light pollution suppression. It allows astrophotos to be taken of narroband emission objects in O-III, H-Beta and H-Alpha lines out of the city.
Specification
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 15
  • Eyepiece Barrel Diameter (mm): 50.8
  • Telescope filter type: Nebula filter
  • Field of application [Telescope-filter]: Light Pollution Filter for Astrophotography
209,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.26 kg
This adapter ring enables you to take colour and nebula filters with M48 and M52 thread
Specification
  • Total length (mm): 56
  • Total width (mm): 7
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 7
  • Colour: black
  • Material: Aluminium
49,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.1 kg More information
Reduces effectively possible reflections by double-stacking LUNT LS80MT and LS100MT H-alpha solar telescopes
Specification
  • Total length (mm): 30
  • Total width (mm): 68
  • Total height (mm): 68
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 90
  • Net Weight total (incl. accessories) (g): 90
  • Extended warranty (years): 5
260,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.35 kg
The L-Pro Filter is the best choice for light pollution suppression and allows astrophotos to be taken of broadband emission objects such as galaxies, reflection nebulae and globular star clusters.
Specification
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 15
  • Eyepiece Barrel Diameter (mm): 50.8
  • Telescope filter type: Nebula filter
  • Field of application [Telescope-filter]: Light Pollution Filter for Astrophotography
204,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.26 kg
The L-Pro Filter is the best choice for light pollution suppression and allows astrophotos to be taken of broadband emission objects such as galaxies, reflection nebulae and globular star clusters.
Specification
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 10
  • Eyepiece Barrel Diameter (mm): 31.7
  • Telescope filter type: Nebula filter
  • Field of application [Telescope-filter]: Light Pollution Filter for Astrophotography
154,00 € * Shipping Weight 0.26 kg
High quality and light gathering binoculars with single focus, lightweight magnesium body, waterproof and filled with nitrogen for use even in unfavourable weather conditions.
Specification
  • Waterproof 8): 1
  • Compass: 0
  • Inert gas purged: 1
  • Total length (mm): 191
  • Optical design: Porro
  • Total width (mm): 202
  • Total height (mm): 66
  • Net weight (without access.) (g): 1165
  • Batteries included: 0
  • Magnification: 10
  • ED glass: 0
  • LE Eyepieces: 1
  • Field of application [Binoculars]: Astronomy,, Night,, Watersport & Sailing
  • Type [Binoculars]: Marine binoculars,, Standard Binoculars
  • Mirror/Lens diam. (mm): 50
  • Material prismn: BaK-4
  • Type of coating: Fully multi-coated
  • Colour of coating: green
  • Exit pupil min. (mm): 5
  • Tripod adapter thread: 1
  • Eyepieces for eyeglass wearers: 1
  • Single eye adjustment: 1
  • Eyecups: Rubber eyecups, foldable
  • Diopter setting: 1
  • Interpupilar distance min. (mm): 56
  • Interpupilar distance max. (mm): 74
  • Eye relief (mm): 20
  • Zoom function: 0
  • Field of view at 1000m 7) (m): 114
  • Field of view (degrees): 6.5
  • Light intensity 7): 25
  • Twilight factor 7): 22.4
  • Near focus from 7) (m): 7
  • Body material: Magnesium
  • Body armouring: Rubber
  • Dust protection caps: dust caps for eyepiece and objective
  • Extended warranty (years): 5
229,00 € * Shipping Weight 2.2 kg More information
ED APO 127mm f/7.5 FCD-1 Alu 2'' R&P Focuser
Specification
  • Reticle: 0
  • Compass: 0
  • Material OTA: Aluminium
  • Focus Group [Telescopes]: Advanced Amateurs
  • Optical design: Apochomatic Refractor
  • Net weight OTA (incl. accessories) (kg): 7.7
  • Product Family [Telescopes]: Refractor telescope
  • Batteries included: 0
  • Maximum recommended magnification: 250
  • ED glass: 1
  • Field of application [Telescopes]: Deep Sky Observation,, Deep Sky Photography,, Lunar observation,, Lunar photography,, Planetary observation,, Planetary photography
  • Tripod height adjustment: 0
  • Mirror/Lens diam. (mm): 127
  • Focal length (mm): 952
  • Angular resolution (arc seconds): 1
  • Type of coating: Enhanced Multilayer Desposition (EMD)
  • Eyepiece Barrel Diameter (mm): 50.8
  • Focusing system: 2" Rack-and-Pinion Focuser with 10:1 reduction
  • Width of image field width 24x36 mm receiver (degrees): 1.8
  • Height of image field width 24x36 mm receiver (degrees): 1.2
  • Colour: white
  • Dust protection caps: Dust protection caps for front lens and eyepiece holder
  • Mount Type [Telescopes]: Optics without Mount
  • Extended warranty (years): 10
1.599,00 € * Shipping Weight 11 kg More information

Experience astronomy with Bresser

For thousands of years, people have been studying the stars in the sky. Particularly conspicuously arranged groups of stars were named long ago - and these names are still found in the signs of the zodiac today. Astronomy has undergone a breathtaking development up to the present day - and there is no end to this development in sight. Galileo was the first person to look at the sky with a telescope 300 years ago - in 1991, the first astronomical telescope (Hubble) was placed in space.

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Would you like to order from us as school, university or public institution? Would you like to order from us as a school, university or public institution? Please direct your enquiry to info(at)bresser.de, stating the invoice address (delivery address if applicable). Delivery is made on account. This also applies to a value of goods of more than 1000.00 Euro.

Even today, astronomers like Galileo begin the first observations with the naked eye. The basic prerequisite for this is, of course, a clear starry sky. That is why astronomers do not wish for friendly greetings at the end of a forum entry, for example, but for Clear Skies (cs abbreviated). No less important is the location of the sky observer: the best observing results can be achieved in a dark location, without any disturbing lights nearby.

Every beginning is difficult: At first, every beginning astronomer finds the first observations difficult, since stars and constellations are always in motion and change position in the sky depending on the season, date and time. One exception is Polaris in the constellation of the "Little Bear". Pole Star is always at the same place in the starry sky in the north and can be found there all year round. The arrangement of the stars, however, depends on the date and time - they rotate slowly counterclockwise around Polaris. Read our big Bresser Telescope Primer, here to learn more about astronomy.

When observing stars with a telescope, it quickly becomes clear that they disappear from the field of view after a few minutes. To compensate for this effect, there are equatorial mounts with an exact hour axis that can be tracked manually or fully automatically. This allows you to follow the exact movement of a star.

 

To the accessories for your telescope!

With Lunt Solarsystems, we offer you high-quality solar telescopes for observing the sun without danger: Marvel at massive prominences, groups of sunspots, powerful energy bursts and much more. Whether you need a complete solar telescope or the appropriate solar filters for retrofitting a normal telescope, we offer you the optimal and safe solution for impressive observations of the sun in the different wavelength ranges H-alpha, Ca-K und white light. Of course you will also find suitable accessories from special adapters to H-Alpha optimised eyepieces.

 

To the solar telescopes!

With the telescopes from EXPLORE SCIENTIFIC , we offer you a wide range of products for advanced amateur astronomers. These telescopes have won numerous awards thanks to a high level of innovation, decades of experience as well as close cooperation with amateur astronomers all over the world.

 

To the telescopes for advanced and experts!!

Even today, astronomers like Galileo begin the first observations with the naked eye. The basic prerequisite for this is, of course, a clear starry sky. That is why astronomers do not wish for friendly greetings at the end of a forum entry, for example, but for Clear Skies (cs abbreviated). No less important is the location of the sky observer: the best observing results can be achieved in a dark location, without any disturbing lights nearby.

Every beginning is difficult: At first, every beginning astronomer finds the first observations difficult, because stars and constellations are always in motion and change position in the sky depending on the season, date and time. One exception is Polaris in the constellation of the Little Bear. The Pole Star is always at the same place in the starry sky in the north and can be found there all year round. However, the arrangement of the celestial bodies depends on the date and time - they rotate slowly counterclockwise around Polaris. For starters, the following video is very informative about how important the mount is for a telescope.